Bokken and Other Wooden Weapons Maintenance

Bokken and Other Wooden Weapons Maintenance

Varnishing, oil polishing, storage, repair and quality standards


Proper maintenance and correct storage of wooden weapons is crucial for two reasons. The first and most important one: security. The second, no less important for the practitioner, is to prevent the weapon from deterioration and warping over time. It is also possible to “repair” a bent weapon to some extent. In this article, we will also talk about our quality standards and processes. You will find all the information you need in this article to take care of your Bokken, Jo, Tanto and other weapons.


Polishing wooden weapons before shipment, at Seido

Polishing wooden weapons before shipment, at Seido

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History of Japanese Bokken & interview with master Nidome Yoshiaki


History of the Japanese Bokken & interview with master Nidome Yoshiaki

An encounter in the mountains of Kyushu: Between the art and its craftsman


The Bokken, wooden imitation of the famous Katana, is almost as old as the latter. Its poor quality in the beginning made it a “consumable item” which could easily be replaced if broken. The Bokken’s quality improved gradually over time but it was not until the early 20th century, with the birth of the workshop in Miyakonojo (Kyushu) that the Bokken, the wooden sword, became a piece of art. At this workshop the ancient art of woodworking met the traditional martial arts, both of them sharing common values.


Master Nidome Yoshiaki - Tanto : Fabrication of the Kissaki

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Bokken – Different Types and Shapes of Japanese Wooden Swords

The different types of Bokken

A visit at the Horinouchi workshop


The Bokken is a tool. It can either faithfully represent a sword, be used for muscle training or, if it is very light, become an instrument in order to work on precision. Some schools even consider the Bokken as weapon itself and study it as such. In Aikido, Kendo or Iaido, relatively conventional Bokken are used, compared to some schools of Kenjutsu, Koryu and Kobudo, for which specific weapons are chosen, especially to support the physical development and the specific techniques of the school.
Since 1923, the Horinouchi workshop takes pride in keeping a copy of every manufactured weapon. Even though the exact number of the available models is unclear, there are certainly over a hundred types displayed in the small private museum of the workshop.


Horinouchi's Workshop

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